Women's Health

Depression and motherhood

About 34 percent of women who participated in a Khayelitsha study on mother and infant relationships showed signs of depression. The study titled ‘€œThula Sana’€ (a Xhosa lullaby) involved about 147 mothers and was conducted by the University of Cape Town Child Guidance clinic over a period of four years. Dr Mark Tomlinson, a senior researcher at the clinic, said a lack of spousal support was one of the leading factors in Post Natal Depression but that this was not the only cause. Added pressures are unemployment, poverty and single parenting. Dr Tomlinson also found that mood swings after women had given birth could impact adversely on the growth of the infant.  Thandeka Teyise of Health-e News spoke to Dr Tomlinson about his research and future plans.

About 34 percent of women who participated in a Khayelitsha study on mother and infant relationships showed signs of depression. The study titled ‘€œThula Sana’€ (a Xhosa lullaby) involved about 147 mothers and was conducted by the University of Cape Town Child Guidance clinic over a period of four years. Dr Mark Tomlinson, a senior researcher at the clinic, said a lack of spousal support was one of the leading factors in Post Natal Depression but that this was not the only cause. Added pressures are unemployment, poverty and single parenting. Dr Tomlinson also found that mood swings after women had given birth could impact adversely on the growth of the infant.  

Thandeka Teyise of Health-e News spoke to Dr Tomlinson about his research and future plans.

To listen click here.

About the author

Thandeka Teyise