HIV and AIDS

Gender and HIV/AIDS

Globally, women are still disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS because they are socially, culturally, biologically and economically more vulnerable and because they shoulder the burden of caring for the sick and dying. Richard Delate, of Journ AIDS and the Centre for AIDS Development and Evaluation (CADRE), says women are still afraid to negotiate condom use and in most cases do not seek treatment for sexually transmitted infections because of the stigma that is still attached to these infections. According to UNAIDS, about 50 percent of adults living with HIV/AIDS globally are women. Women constitute 58 percent of HIV/AIDS positive adults in Sub-Saharan Africa, 55 percent in North Africa and Middle East and 50 percent in the Caribbean. Thandeka Theyise of Health-e News Service compiled this report.

Globally, women are still disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS because they are socially, culturally, biologically and economically more vulnerable and because they shoulder the burden of caring for the sick and dying. Richard Delate, of Journ AIDS and the Centre for AIDS Development and Evaluation (CADRE), says women are still afraid to negotiate condom use and in most cases do not seek treatment for sexually transmitted infections because of the stigma that is still attached to these infections. According to UNAIDS, about 50 percent of adults living with HIV/AIDS globally are women. Women constitute 58 percent of HIV/AIDS positive adults in Sub-Saharan Africa, 55 percent in North Africa and Middle East and 50 percent in the Caribbean. Thandeka Theyise of Health-e News Service compiled this report.

The audio is in English and in isiXhosa.

To listen click here.

About the author

Thandeka Teyise