HIV and AIDS

AIDS, sex and secrecy

In many parts of Africa, talking openly about matters of sexuality is taboo and there is still a stigma attached to illnesses such as HIV/AIDS. In many traditionally patriarchal cultures, women and young people have little status or power when it comes to decision-making and this affects their ability to negotiate safe sex. Professor Davison Munodawafa, Director of the Guidance, Counseling and Youth Development Centre for Africa in Malawi, says while sex remains a private issue, AIDS has forced some parents to open up and talk about sex.

In many parts of Africa, talking openly about matters of sexuality is taboo and there is still a stigma attached to illnesses such as HIV/AIDS. In many traditionally patriarchal cultures, women and young people have little status or power when it comes to decision-making and this affects their ability to negotiate safe sex. Professor Davison Munodawafa, Director of the Guidance, Counseling and Youth Development Centre for Africa in Malawi, says while sex remains a private issue, AIDS has forced some parents to open up and talk about sex.

 Thandeka Teyise of Health-e spoke to Professor Munodawafa and asked him why so much secrecy still surrounded matters of sex and AIDS.

This report is in isiXhosa and English.

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About the author

Thandeka Teyise