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Cashier claims company falls foul of workplace rules

Written by Lungile Thamela

Nomadlozi Mazibuko claims she was injured on the job. More than a month later, she claims her Johannesburg firm is withholding the paperwork she needs for treatment.

Nomadlozi Mazibuko says she needs forms completed by her company regarding her alleged injury on the job before doctors can treat her (File photo)

Nomadlozi Mazibuko says she needs forms completed by her company regarding her alleged injury on the job before doctors can treat her (File photo)

In January, Mazibuko began working as cashier in a canteen for the Johannesburg-based Tsebo Outsourcing Group. In October, Mazibuko claims she hurt her knee one morning while setting out chairs for a company event. By lunch time, Mazibuko’s knee was painfully swollen. She finished her shift but the next day went to see a private doctor, Dr Colleen Amos, who referred her to the Tshepo-Themba Private Hospital for x-rays. When x-rays could find nothing wrong with Mazibuko’s knee, she was sent home with a knee brace.

However when Amos asked for Mazibuko for completed forms to access workers’ compensation, Mazibuko said she had never been informed about workers’ compensation.

“In my contract with the company, there was nothing that states health and safety conditions and I never received any kind of health and safety induction or training in the company,” she added.

According to Mazibuko’s mother, Lidia Moeketsi, a Tsebo Outsourcing Group district manager said she was not aware of the accident and promised to get back to Moeketsi when she had more information.

Mazibuko admits that she had 2007 operation on leg but says that she was able to run, walk and do other physical activities without pain following the operation. She maintains that she only begun pain in her leg again after she twisted it at work in early October.

[quote float= right]She has that injury for the long time, it was not from our company”

Now Mazibuko alleges it has been more than a month and Tsebo Outsourcing Group have not provided her with completed paperwork to report the alleged workplace accident that would allow her to access health care for the injury.

According to Mazibuko, when her mother called Tsebo Outsourcing Group to ask for the forms, she was allegedly told that company employees believe Mazibuko’s pain is due to her previous injury and not, as she claims, due to events at work.

Amos added that she had also called to follow up about the letter. Amos alleged that the employees she spoke to were rude and seemed to have a poor understanding of the necessary paperwork that needed to be completed. She told OurHealth that if Mazibuko is not treated, there might be a possibility of infection.

Tsebo Outsourcing Group Human Resources Manager Vuyo Maqhasho said the issue is still under investigation and would be handled by management.

“The issue of Nomadlozi has been taken to our management as it is under investigation,” Maqhasho said. “For the forms to be filled in late – it is because she reported late about her injury.”

“She has that injury for the long time, it was not from our company,” she added. Maqhasho said she could not confirm or deny that Mazibuko had received a safety induction when she began working at the company.

 

 

About the author

Lungile Thamela

Lungile Thamela is an OurHealth Citizen Journalist reporting from Gauteng's Johannesburg Health District.