Disability OurHealth

Government, community reach out to North West disabled, aged

Written by Kagisho Modise

Government recently held winter games in the North West to help bring health services and education to the region’s people living with disabilities and elderly.

The recent winter games were estimated to cost more than R1 million. (File photo)

The recent winter games were estimated to cost more than R1 million. (File photo)

The games were held in Makwassie, about 100 kms south west of Klerksdorp, in partnership with the local non-governmental organisation Atta-Ele-Roi, which offers family services. Different organisations, such as LoveLife, were invited to provide health education and services to the public. Mobile HIV testing clinics ran next to booths distributing first aid kits. Public talks were also held on topics including social security and insurance.

Dudu Gloria Thokgane of the Department of Social Development told OurHealth that the games were especially aimed at those living with disabilities and the elderly.

“Our aim is to give people the information they need to follow a healthy lifestyle as well as reaching out to the disabled and the aged in the community so that they know they have not been forgotten,” said Thokgane.

Sedupe Keamogetswe, 31, was born disabled. He told OurHealth that he enjoyed the games and the health information he received.

“I really feel blessed about the encouragement I received by being here. I was telling myself deep inside how government ignores the disabled people, but now I see that we really mean a lot to the country,” he said.

“Nowadays local authorities promise to focus on us disabled people in terms of job creation and alleviating poverty and we really appreciate the effort,” said Keamogetswe.

Sister Ntsikwe Lesego Tlhogwane, a mobile clinic nurse at Makwassie Clinic, who was working at the Winter Games said it was important that government brought health screening services to the community.

“It is important the community knows their status of HIV, high blood pressure (hypertension) and tuberculosis so that they can get early treatment if necessary,” she said.

About the author

Kagisho Modise

Kagisho Modise is an OurHealth Citizen Journalist reporting from the North West's Dr. Kenneth Kaunda Health District.